offices

TORRANCE
21250 Hawthorne Blvd., #700
Torrance, CA 90503
Phone: (310) 776-5604

ORANGE
500 North State College Blvd., #1100 
Orange
CA 92868

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Immigration

Immigration to the United States can lead to opportunities and a brighter future. However, the immigration laws of the United States are often complicated and difficult to understand. Let the professionals of the Law Offices of Jason Murai help you understand your immigration options and help you successfully navigate the complicated immigration rules and procedures.

The Law Offices of Jason Murai provide immigration services for individuals, families and businesses and work on matters including non-immigrant work visas, green cards, student visas, citizenship and family-based immigration.

Working Visas

The United States welcomes thousands of foreign workers in multiple occupations or employment categories every year. These include artists, researchers, cultural exchange participants, information technology specialists, religious workers, investors, scientists, athletes, nurses, agricultural workers and others. All foreign workers must obtain permission to work legally in the United States. Each employment category for admission has different requirements, conditions and authorized periods of stay. It is important that you adhere to the terms of your application or petition for admission and visa. Any violation can result in removal or denial of re-entry into the United States.

Temporary (Nonimmigrant) Worker

A temporary worker is an individual seeking to enter the United States temporarily for a specific purpose. Nonimmigrants enter the United States for a temporary period of time, and once in the United States, are restricted to the activity or reason for which their nonimmigrant visa was issued.

Permanent (Immigrant) Worker

A permanent worker is an individual who is authorized to live and work permanently in the United States.

Students and Exchange Visitors

Students and exchange visitors may, under certain circumstances, be allowed to work in the United States. They must obtain permission from an authorized official at their school. The authorized official is known as a Designed School Official (DSO) for students and the Responsible Officer (RO) for exchange visitors.

Information for Employers & Employees

Employers must verify that an individual whom they plan to employ or continue to employ in the United States is authorized to accept employment in the United States. Individuals, such as those who have been admitted as permanent residents, granted asylum or refugee status, or admitted in work-related nonimmigrant classifications, may have employment authorization as a direct result of their immigration status. Other aliens may need to apply individually for employment authorization.

Temporary Visitors For Business

To visit the United States for business purposes you will need to obtain a visa as a temporary visitor for business (B-1 visa), unless you qualify for admission without a visa under the Visa Waiver Program.

Green Cards (Permanent Residence)

A permanent resident is someone who has been granted authorization to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis. As proof of that status, a person is granted a permanent resident card, commonly called a “green card.” You can become a permanent resident several different ways. Most individuals are sponsored by a family member or employer in the United States. Other individuals may become permanent residents through refugee or asylee status or other humanitarian programs. In some cases, you may be eligible to file for yourself.
The steps to become a permanent resident are different for each category and will depend on if you are currently living inside or outside the United States.

Citizenship

The United States has a long history of welcoming immigrants from all parts of the world. America values the contributions of immigrants who continue to enrich this country and preserve its legacy as a land of freedom and opportunity.

Deciding to become a U.S. citizen is one of the most important decisions in an individual’s life. If you decide to apply to become a U.S. citizen, you will be showing your commitment to the United States and your loyalty to its Constitution. In return, you are rewarded with all the rights and privileges that are part of U.S. citizenship.

You may become a U.S. citizen either at birth or after birth. Individuals who are born in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction of the United States and individuals born in certain territories or outlying possessions of the United States are citizens at birth. Also, individuals born outside the United States may be citizens at birth if their parent or parents were citizens at the time of birth and other requirements are met.

Additionally, you may become a U.S. citizen after birth either through your parents, known as “derived” or “acquired” citizenship, or by applying for naturalization on your own.

  • Citizenship Through Naturalization
  • Citizenship Through Parents
  • Citizenship for Military Members and Dependents
  • Members and veterans of the U.S. armed forces and their dependents may be eligible for special naturalization provisions.

Family

How Can I Help a Family Member Immigrate?

Your status determines which relatives (or future relatives such as a fiancé(e) or prospective adopted child) may be eligible to receive immigration benefits. In order to help a family member immigrate to the United States, you must be a:

  • U.S. citizen
  • Permanent resident (green card holder)
  • Refugee admitted as a refugee within the past 2 years or asylee granted asylum within the past 2 years

We offer free, 30 minute initial consultations.